martes, 1 de marzo de 2011

Jane Russell

The death of Jane Russell at the age of 89 has robbed Hollywood of one of its most legendary pin-ups. The Minnesota-born actress and hoofer was spotted modelling in 1940 by eccentric millionaire Howard Hawks who signed her up to a seven-year contract and immediately cast her in The Outlaw under the tag- line: "how'd you like to tussle with Russell?".
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This biopic of Billy The Kid was designed to showcase Russell's voluptuous figure as much as her acting talents but problems with the censorship office (who felt that too much of her voluptuous figure was being showcased) http://www.debra-paget.com/janerussell/jane0033.jpgmeant that the release of the film was delayed for two years. As it turned out, the whole controversy (not to mention the widespread release of film stills from the movie) sealed Russell's status as a Hollywood pin-up, particularly among US servicemen abroad.
http://www.debra-paget.com/janerussell/jane0055.jpgThough she was never acclaimed on the acting front, Jane Russell made some 20 Hollywood movies throughout her career including The Paleface (1948), opposite Bob Hope; His Kind of Woman (1951), opposite Robert Mitchum and, most famously, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) opposite Marilyn Monroe. The success of that last film (Russell's finest hour) led to both stars having their hand and foot prints immortalised in cement opposite Grauman's Chinese Theater.
http://www.debra-paget.com/janerussell/jane0034.jpgAway from the screen, Jane Russell, who was married three times and adopted three children, was well known for her efforts on behalf of American families hoping to adopt children from overseas. She established the World Adoption International Fund in 1955 and was also heavily involved in Hollywood Christian Groups. Though she retired from the big screen in 1970, she became a well known figure on American TV throughout that decade as the official spokeswoman for Playtex.
http://www.debra-paget.com/janerussell/jane0006.jpgBut it's as one of Hollywood's most endearing pin-ups that Jane Russell will be forever remembered, a woman of whom Bob Hope once quipped, "culture is the ability to describe Jane Russell without moving your hands."