lunes, 18 de julio de 2011

Ex-London policy deputy explains his resignation

 FILE - Former Chief executive of News International, Rebekah Brooks leaves a hotel in central London, in this Sunday, July 10, 2011 file photo.  Sky television sources reported on Sunday July 17 2011 that Brookes had been arrested by police investigating a phone hacking and corruption scandal that has engulfed Rupert Murdoch's British media company. Scotland Yard confirmed that a 43 year old woman had been arrested. Photo: Sang Tan / AP Former London police deputy John Yates says he acted with complete integrity in Britain's phone hacking crisis.

Yates was the second high-profile casualty from the Metropolitan Police to resign in the past 24 hours. His resignation earlier Monday followed the decision of his boss, Paul Stephenson, to leave his post Sunday night.

Yates was the official who decided two years ago not to reopen police inquiries into phone hacking, saying he did not believe there was any new evidence.

He expressed his "deep regret" on Monday but said his "conscience is clear."

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.  British Prime Minister David Cameron is cutting back his trip to Africa even further so he can prepare for an emergency session of Parliament on the phone hacking crisis.

Cameron's office announced Monday that the trip was being cut short by seven hours. The high-profile resignations are making it harder for Cameron to contain the intensifying scandal on the eve of an unwelcome public grilling by lawmakers for Rupert Murdoch and his son James.

Cameron had had initially intended to spend five days traveling to four countries, including Rwanda and South Sudan.

He had already cut back his trip, dropping stops in Rwanda and South Sudan. He cut back the trip further on Monday.