viernes, 11 de febrero de 2011

Names of all six Cork air crash victims released

Wreckage of aircraft The aircraft had two crew and 10 passengers on board 
The names of the six people who died in Thursday's Cork Airport crash have now been released.
Brendan McAleese, Pat Cullinan and Michael Evans were all from Northern Ireland.
Co-pilot Andrew Cantle and passenger Richard Noble were from England and pilot Jordi Gola Lopez was Spanish.
Five teams from Ireland, the UK, Spain and the US, are investigating what caused the flight from Belfast to crash on landing.
The wreckage of the Manx2 plane remains in Cork on Friday as investigators try to find out precisely what went wrong.
Two flight recorders have already been removed from the scene.
The plane, which was travelling from Belfast, came down in thick fog and burst into flames. Six people died and six were injured.
Leading the investigation is Leo Murray of the Air Accident Investigation Unit. He said four investigators were at the scene an hour and a half after the crash happened.
"Yesterday we completed a site survey at Cork and we've done a preliminary inspection of the wreckage," he said.
"Late last night we were successful in recovering the so-called black boxes - the flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder - which will be crucial to my investigation.
"We've also impounded all the air traffic records at the airport."
He said it was important to keep an open mind in any air accident investigation.
Preliminary report Irish Minister for Transport Pat Carey said a preliminary report on the crash would likely be available within weeks, although a more detailed one would take much longer.
Mr Carey said what was clear from initial reports was "how quickly the emergency response got under way".
Mr Carey said he had been in contact with his counterpart in the Northern Ireland Assembly, Regional Development Minister Conor Murphy, on Thursday.
"There is very good liaison between the two administrations to ensure there is seamless support available to everybody on both sides of the border," he said.

CRASH INVESTIGATION

Irish aviation journalist Gerry Byrne outlines what air accident investigators will focus on at the crash site.
Flight data recorders - enable investigators to recreate aircrafts last flight, its movement through the air and its approach and angle.
Cockpit voice recorder - pilot's may say things on the cockpit voice recorder that you don't hear or you don't realise is happening. They will also listen to the tapes of the conversations the pilots had with air traffic controllers in Cork and examine the radar tape.
Final approach - why did the pilot chose to make a third landing, was there a problem with disorientation, visibility, did one of the wings hit the ground on landing, engine failure.
Wreckage - they will be trying to see if all the components of the aircraft are there and if they were working at the time.
Names released
Among the victims was Brendan McAleese, who was from Tannaghmore in County Antrim and was a cousin of Irish president, Mary McAleese's husband.
Pat Cullinan was originally from Omagh, County Tyrone, and a partner in accountancy firm KPMG in Belfast. A third victim, Captain Michael Evans, was a deputy harbour master at Belfast Harbour.
The Spanish pilot, who has been named as Jordi Gola Lopez, was also killed alongside his British co-pilot Andrew Cantle, who was from the north of England.
The sixth victim was Richard Noble from Derbyshire.
Bishop John Buckley, bishop of Cork and Ross, said there was a "great sense of sadness" in the area.
He said he hoped to organise a prayer service in Cork for the families affected by the crash.
Injured Meanwhile, relatives of some of the six people injured in the accident have been visiting them at Cork University Hospital.
Dr Gerry McCarthy, a consultant at the hospital, said: "We've got four people with serious injures, two of them had to go to our intensive care unit where they remain at the minute.
Captain Michael Evans Captain Michael Evans was a deputy harbour master in Belfast
"They have remained stable throughout the day so really they're stable, but with serious injuries involving their chest, abdomen and spine."
The flight was scheduled to depart Belfast at 0750 GMT and eventually left at 0812 GMT. It was due to land in Cork at 0910 GMT.
The plane first attempted to land from a southerly direction on Cork's main runway, known as Runway 17. This was aborted due to low visibility.
It then tried to land on the opposite, northerly, approach to the main runway - known as Runway 35. The Aviation Authority said it is believed wind was not a problem, but the pilot was still unhappy with visibility.
The plane went into a holding position for 20 minutes, before making a third attempt to land on the southerly approach to the main runway.
At 0940 GMT, the plane was 10 miles out from the airport. At 0950 GMT, the plane hit the ground at what is called the 'western threshold' of the runway. Eye witnesses reported hearing a loud bang.
It is understood the plane flipped over on landing and caught fire.
Things are unlikely to return to normal at Cork Airport until late on Friday afternoon with some flights cancelled and some diverted to Shannon Airport.